F&P RFE/RL Archive


Menu:

Main Sections
| Home | Bulletin Board | Chat Room | F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
| 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1996 | 1995 | 1994 | 1993 | 1992 | 1991 | Search

News
| News From Russia/NIS | News About Russia/NIS | Newspapers & Magazines | Global News | Weather



RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 81, 26 April 1991



BALTIC STATES



PARATROOPERS SEIZE MORE BUILDINGS IN LITHUANIA. On April 25 Soviet
paratroopers occupied a number of buildings and air fields, Radio
Kaunas reported that day. The buildings included technical schools
in Alytus, Marijampole, Panevezys, Siauliai, Klaipeda, Kaunas,
and Vilnius, the "Signal" hotel in Alytus, and the "Sauletekis"
factory. Three airfields were also seized. In the buildings the
soldiers confiscated everything available, under the pretext
that the materials belonged to the Soviet DOSAAF. Algimantas
Norvilas, chairman of the "Vytis" sports club (formed after the
reorganization of DOSAAF in Lithuania), noted that all the buildings
had been built using Lithuanian funds, and disputes about motor
vehicles had been settled with DOSAAF officials in Moscow. (Saulius
Girnius)

SOVIET MVD SOLDIER SHOT IN VILNIUS. On April 25 Soviet MVD Sergeant
R. Akhmedov was killed from a shot by a colleague who was handling
his weapon improperly, TASS reported that day. Military Prosecutor
of the Vilnius garrison Lieutenant Colonel V. Ushenin said that
both soldiers were sober and there were no grounds to assume
that the shooting was deliberate. The soldiers were guarding
the Vilnius Radio and Television tower seized by Soviet troops
on January 13 killing 15 people. (Saulius Girnius)

REUNIFICATION IN ESTONIA. A group of Petseri residents have appealed
to Estonia's Supreme Council Chairman Arnold Ruutel to begin
talks on their status, Paevaleht reported on April 23. Petseri
was part of interwar Estonia, but was annexed in 1945 to the
Pskov oblast. As citizens of the previous Republic of Estonia,
Petseri's residents think they should be reunited with the current
Estonian republic. In their appeal, residents called on the Supreme
Council to nullify its 1945 resolution handing over Petseri to
the RSFSR, that immediate talks begin with the RSFSR "on resolving
the problem," and that residents be allowed to vote for the planned
state assembly set to replace both the Supreme Council and the
alternative Congress of Estonia. (Riina Kionka)



USSR - ALL-UNION TOPICS



DESPITE CRITICISM, GORBACHEV WINS VOTE OF CONFIDENCE. The two-day
CPSU Central Committee plenum that ended April 25 featured harsh
criticism of Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev and his policies,
TASS and Western agencies reported April 26. At one point during
the second day, Gorbachev strode to the rostrum and offered abruptly
to resign as Party general secretary. This is by no means the
first time Gorbachev has offered to resign; as on previous occasions,
the offer was overwhelmingly voted down. Only 13 voted for, with
322 against and 14 abstentions. The episode repeated the pattern
at last year's Party Congress. On both occasions, hardline Communists
made fierce criticisms of Gorbachev's policies in an attempt
to influence his behavior; he called their bluff by offering
to resign, whereupon they realized that, without him, the CPSU
would split into two. This would be a solution favored by many
liberals and reformers, but for conservative Party apparatchiks,
dependent on the Party's system of privilege for their very livelihood,
such a course is anathema. (Elizabeth Teague)

PAVLOV URGES PARTY TO BE PRAGMATIC. Addressing the CPSU plenum,
USSR Prime Minister Valentin Pavlov said that "the market demands
freedom for the producer, which presupposes the possibility...to
manage one's property"; such freedom does not, he insisted, contradict
the Party's programmatic goals, TASS reported April 25. Pavlov
argued that the de-nationalization and privatization measures
contained in his anti-crisis program would offset the impact
of price reform and help solve the problem of dividing property
between the center and the republics and other regions. Pavlov
declared his readiness to "broaden the social base of the government"
and to include "representatives of republics and movements" among
its members. Pavlov has, however, already reneged on an earlier
promise to promote more republican representatives to leading
positions in the USSR Cabinet of Ministers. (Dawn Mann)

PLENUM DECIDES ON CONSULTATIONS WITH OTHER PARTIES. The CPSU
CC has resolved to hold political consultations with other political
parties and movements, TASS reported April 25. A resolution passed
at the plenum April 25 instructed the Central Committee's Secretariat
to invite various political parties and movements to discuss
joint actions aimed at leading the USSR out of crisis. This seems
to be the first serious reaction to the idea of holding a roundtable
of various political parties, promoted at pro-democratic mass
rallies in Moscow in February and March, 1990. Later this idea
was taken up by members of the democratic faction at the RSFSR
Congress of People's Deputies, but until now the central Soviet
leadership had ignored the proposal. (On the attitude of the
USSR's various political groups to the idea of a roundtable,
see Moscow News, No. 15, p. 5. (Vera Tolz)

MORE ON JOINT DECLARATION, YELTSIN'S REACTION. Among the provisions
of the "Joint Declaration on Urgent Measures for the Stabilization
of the Situation in the Country and for Overcoming the Crisis"
(see Daily Report, April 25) is an appeal to striking miners
and all other workers of the country to end "strikes for economic
and political reasons." The statement also called for early all-Union
elections, a new constitution and rapid conclusion of a Union
treaty (TASS, April 25). Reporting to the RSFSR Supreme Soviet
the same day on Gorbachev's meeting with leaders of the Union
republics, RSFSR Supreme Soviet Chairman Boris Yeltsin described
the signed declaration as a "tremendous victory." He said by
signing the document with the leaders of nine republics, Gorbachev
recognized them as "sovereign states," TASS reported. (Vera Tolz)


STRIKES CONTINUE BUT END MAY BE IN SIGHT. Striking coal miners
in Vorkuta plan to return to work late in the day on April 27,
following a preliminary accord between RSFSR and USSR officials
on placing the mines under RSFSR control, TASS reported April
25. They have said, however, that they may resume the strike
if their political demands are not met. Miners at the Raspadskaya
mine, who had returned to work earlier this week, are back on
strike, according to Reuters April 25. Miners in the Kuzbass
will stay out on strike: Kemerovo strike committee member Nikolai
Volkov characterized Wednesday's joint Gorbachev/Yeltsin statement
as a "useless scrap of paper," according to Reuters April 25.
Some 10,000 metro-construction workers in Leningrad struck on
Thursday to demand higher wages and Gorbachev's resignation,
while Yeltsin told the RSFSR Supreme Soviet in a closed session
that he thinks the strikes could end by May 1, DPA reported April
25. A republic-wide strike has been called by Democratic Russia
and the Federation of Independent Russian Trade Unions for Saturday.
(Dawn Mann)

CPSU POLITBURO ISSUES MAY DAY SLOGANS. The Politburo has at last
published a set of slogans for May Day (Sovetskaya Rossiya, April
26). The list is shorter than ever (there are only 14 slogans)
and has appeared a week later than normal. The delay may be due
to fact that, for the first time ever, the slogans drop their
normal triumphalism and speak openly of the Soviet Union's problems.
They call for "spiritual rebirth" and "moral regeneration" and,
in the most striking departure from tradition, exhort Soviet
workers to rescue the country from "the crisis" and "prevent
the collapse of the national economy." Until Gorbachev's rise
to power, Soviet leaders maintained that crises happened only
in capitalist countries and were impossible in socialist ones.
(Elizabeth Teague)

COMMUNIST PEOPLE'S DEPUTIES OPPOSE SPECIAL CONGRESS SESSION.
In response to calls for the convening of an extraordinary session
of the USSR Congress of People's Deputies issued by the conservative
"Soyuz" faction, a group of USSR Supreme Soviet members who are
also members of the CPSU has said it opposes such calls. TASS
April 25 quoted a spokesman for the group, Gennadii Kiselev,
as saying a special session is unnecessary as there are no new
issues to discuss, would be expensive, and would keep people
from the spring sowing. (Dawn Mann)

USSR AGREES TO CO-SPONSOR MIDEAST TALKS. After meetings with
US Secretary of State James Baker in Kislovodsk, Foreign Minister
Aleksandr Bessmertnykh said the USSR "intends to act as co-sponsor
of [a] conference" for negotiating a settlement in the Middle
East. According to a report in today's New York Times (April
26), Bessmertnykh's announcement of the USSR's willingness to
hold such a conference was halting. The Times says "it took [Bessmertnykh]
four tries at two separate news conferences with Baker to state
explicitly that Moscow would serve as a co-sponsor with Washington."
(Suzanne Crow)

RELATIONS WITH ISRAEL? Israel insists the USSR must agree to
full diplomatic relations before Moscow be permitted to participate
in a Middle East peace conference. The USSR's agreement to co-sponsor
the peace conference with the United States suggests movement
in this direction. Bessmertnykh was quoted by Vremya on April
25, as saying "our relations with Israel are developing and progressing,
and if that tendency continues in the future, then there will
be no particular difficulty in establishing diplomatic relations
on a full level." His plans to travel to Israel next month are
definite, TASS reported April 25. (Suzanne Crow)

SINO-SOVIET SUMMIT IN MAY. Chinese Communist Party General Secretary
Jiang Zhemin will visit Moscow from May 15-19 marking the first
Soviet-Chinese communist party summit since 1957, AFP reported
April 24. (Suzanne Crow)

SOVIET PILOT ASKS FOR ASYLUM IN TURKEY. A Soviet airman has asked
for asylum after flying an MI-8 military transport helicopter
from an airfield in the southern Transcaucasus district to Turkey,
Reuter and TASS report. The flight took place on the night of
April 24. Turkish Foreign Ministry officials told the semi-official
Anatolian News Agency that the pilot was being questioned, and
said that he was an Armenian. On April 25, however, TASS identified
the airman as Lieutenant I. Gimatov, a name that would appear
to be Moslem rather than Armenian. (Stephen Foye)

DECREE ON AFGHAN VETERANS. Gorbachev issued a decree on April
25 that ordered the USSR Cabinet of Ministers to complete, by
June 1, a plan outlining increased social benefits for veterans
of the Afghan war. The package is to include occupational re-training
(to ease veterans' transition into a market economy), increased
medical benefits (to insure that all invalids are ambulatory
by 1993), and the creation of a fund to benefit veterans of foreign
wars. The decree calls on the USSR Defense Council to coordinate
these activities. It addresses concerns long expressed by military
spokesmen, and comes as Afghan veterans play an expanding role
in domestic policing activities. (Stephen Foye)

SHCHIT DELEGATION IN GERMANY. A delegation from the renegade
military union Shchit ("Shield") arrived in Bonn on April 25
in order to begin discussions with representatives of the German
army's own long established military union, TASS reported. According
to the leader of the Soviet delegation, RSFSR People's Deputy
Vitalii Urazhtsev, the purpose of the visit is to gather information
and to benefit from the experience of the German union so as
to better protect the rights of Soviet servicemen. Urazhtsev
said that Shchit hoped both to build concrete ties with the German
union and to ultimately gain admittance into the European organization
of military unions. (Stephen Foye)

SOVIET ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR VICTIMS FORMED. A new Soviet
public organization has been formed to publicize the problems
of people who tested nuclear weapons and took part in military
exercises involving nuclear arms. TASS reported April 24 that
the "Committee of Veterans of Special Risk Units" says that many
of those who helped build up the USSR's nuclear weapons capability
died or suffered radiation damage. The committee's chairman,
Vladimir Bentsianov, told TASS that the committee wants to help
victims obtain the special food, medical treatment, and social
protection they need. It will also ask the Soviet government
to accord these people the status of war veterans, and to compensate
them monetarily for their suffering. (NCA/Sallie Wise)

NO NEW LABOR CAMPS. The Soviet Interior Ministry has denied rumors
that it is constructing new labor camps in Siberia, Yakutia,
and Kolyma. According to a Radio Rossii report of April 24, an
MVD statement that day said that the ministry lacks funds to
bring existing camps up to United Nations standards, let alone
to build new ones. (NCA/Sallie Wise)

KGB AND ECOLOGY. Corresponding member of the USSR Academy of
Sciences Alexei Yablokov has called on the KGB to create an efficient
structure within the agency to prevent the penetration of ecologically
harmful technology into the USSR. In an interview with Komsomol'skaya
pravda on April 12, Yablokov said that the KGB must watch the
"ecological imperialists" who are trying to impose on the USSR
technologies forbidden in other countries. Yablokov, who is a
former chairman of the Soviet division of "Greenpeace," said
the KGB must stop the export from the USSR of valuable raw materials
camouflaged as industrial junk. (Victor Yasmann)

KRAVCHENKO TO BE REPLACED AS USSR PEOPLE'S DEPUTY. The USSR Journalists'
Union decided to recall the chairman of the USSR State Television
and Radio Broadcasting Company, Leonid Kravchenko, as the union's
representative to the USSR Supreme Soviet. Earlier this month,
Kravchenko was expelled from the Union, which elected him USSR
People's Deputy in 1989. Radio Moscow-1 reported April 25 that
the Union proposed two candidates as deputies to the Soviet parliament
instead of Kravchenko. They are the newly elected chairman of
the Union, Eduard Sagalaev, and Galdibek Shalakhmetov, the press
secretary of Kazakh President Nazarbaev. (Vera Tolz)

"VZGLYAD" TO BECOME JOINT-STOCK COMPANY. On April 15 a district
soviet in Moscow registered a new joint-stock company "'Vzglyad'
From the Underground," set up by moderators of the popular TV
show "Vzglyad," which was banned last year. Kommersant (No. 15)
quoted the moderators as saying they continued to prepare broadcasts
despite the ban and submitted the programs to republican televisions
in the Baltic States, Georgia, Armenia and Moldavia. Now the
joint-stock company will continue supplying republican television
with the program free of charge and will sell video cassettes
of "Vzglyad" to individual citizens as well as video salons.
(Vera Tolz)



USSR - IN THE REPUBLICS



DEMOCRATIC RUSSIA CRITICIZES YELTSIN FOR DECLARATION. Leaders
of the pro-Yeltsin Democratic Russia movement complained that
the chairman of the Russian parliament made too many concessions
in signing the declaration with Gorbachev. On April 25 Reuters
quoted Lev Ponomarev as saying he was most concerned about the
declaration's call to stop strikes. Another Democratic Russia
official, Nikolai Sukhanov, said he hoped Yeltsin will properly
explain his action. (Vera Tolz)

YELTSIN MOST POPULAR CANDIDATE FOR PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS. Boris
Yeltsin is the most popular candidate for the upcoming presidential
elections in the RSFSR, Rabochaya tribuna reported April 25.
According to an opinion poll conducted by the newspaper at a
number of enterprises in the Russian Federation, in terms of
popularity Yeltsin is immediately followed by Leningrad city
soviet chairman Anatolii Sobchak. Surprisingly the third place
is occupied by former prime minister Nikolai Ryzhkov, while the
fourth is shared by former MVD chief Vadim Bakatin and USSR people's
deputy Galina Starovoitova. (Vera Tolz)

DEMOCRATIC RUSSIA SUPPORTS GENERAL STRIKE APRIL 26. The all-Russian
"warning strike" in protest of Gorbachev's policies will be held
April 26 as planned, TASS quoted the Democratic Russia movement
as saying. Representatives of the movement, supported by another
organization--the Federation of Independent Trade Unions of the
RSFSR--stressed they were going to ignore the call to end strikes
put forth in the joint declaration by Gorbachev and the leaders
of nine Union republics. (Vera Tolz)

DEMOCRATIC RUSSIA TO HOLD MAY DAY DEMONSTRATION MONDAY. The Democratic
Russia movement said it will hold a May Day demonstration on
Manezh Square next Monday (April 29) instead of May 1 on Red
Square as earlier planned. The Moscow Federation of Trade Unions
and the Association of Free Trade Unions of the Russian Federation
plan to hold rallies on Red Square on May 1, Radio Moscow-1 reported
April 25. (NCA/Vera Tolz)

CHERNOBYL ANNIVERSARY. Today, the fifth anniversary of the world's
worst nuclear accident, will be marked in the Soviet Union by
demonstrations, marches, fund-raising marathons, and memorial
services. In a message to world leaders thanking them for their
help, Gorbachev admitted that the full consequences of the disaster
are still not known. Some members of the US Congress, including
Christopher Cox of California, have criticized the Soviet government
in recent days for its five-year information coverup of the disaster.
The anniversary is taking place in an atmosphere of continued
uncertainty: Ukrainian people's deputy Volodymyr Yavorivsky told
TASS that the sarcophagus over the damaged reactor is in danger
of exploding. (NCA/Kathy Mihalisko)

METROPOLITAN FILARET ON CHERNOBYL. Ukrinform-TASS reported on
April 24 about the appeal by the metropolitan of Kiev and Galicia,
Filaret, and the Holy Synod of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church.
In this appeal, issued on the fifth anniversary of the Chernobyl
disaster, the metropolitan called upon believers to let this
date be a day of commemoration, love, charity, and Christian
unity. The metropolitan and the Holy Synod asked all Ukrainian
Orthodox churches to hold memorial services for the Chernobyl
victims on April 26. (Oxana Antic)

CHURCH MEDAL FOR CHERNOBYL FIREMEN. Also on April 24, Ukrinform-TASS
reported that metropolitan Filaret, in the name of Patriarch
Aleksii, presented the medal of Saint Vladimir to representatives
of Ukraine's firemen. The metropolitan said how highly the Church
values the courage that firemen showed when liquidating the results
of the Chernobyl accident. The metropolitan handed the firemen
a check for over 100,000 rubles - a donation from the Church
to the families of those workers who suffered after the accident.
(Oxana Antic)

ORSHA WORKERS FACE PROSECUTION. TASS said April 25 that Belorussian
officials have begun criminal proceedings against workers in
Orsha who have been taking part in this week's political strikes
in the republic. Organizers claim that up to 15,000 protesters
managed to block numerous freight and passenger trains on one
of the main railway links between Moscow and the west. Work stoppages
and rallies meanwhile continued in Minsk yesterday, but there
are reports that strike committees may call off the protests
until the Belorussian Supreme Soviet convenes May 21. The republican
Minister of the Interior appealed April 25 to his USSR counterpart,
Boriss Pugo, to send Belorussian troops home from Nagorno-Karabakh.
(Belorussian BD/Kathy Mihalisko)

ZNAMYA YUNOSTI UNDER THREAT. RFE-RL has learned that the staff
of the liberal daily Znamya yunosti, which is sponsored by the
Belorussian Komsomol, is considering going on strike. At a Komsomol
plenum in recent days, the paper's chief editor, A. Klaskovskii,
was criticized for devoting too much coverage to events not connected
to the Communist youth organization. Klaskovskii failed to be
reconfirmed as chief editor. The staff of Belorussia's most popular
newspaper fears that it will be replaced by more conformist journalists.
(Belorussian BD/Kathy Mihalisko)

UKRAINE APPOINTS DEFENSE COMMISSION. The Ukrainian Supreme Soviet's
recently formed Permanent Commission on Questions of Internal
and External Security has been renamed. On April 24, Radio Kiev
reported, the parliament voted to call it the Commission on Questions
of Defense and State Security. The move is in keeping with Ukraine's
growing self-assertiveness in matters related to the military
and security. (Kathy Mihalisko)

UKRAINIAN STUDENTS END STRIKE. Ukrainian students yesterday decided
not to continue their strike, Radio Kiev reported April 25. The
announcement was made at a session of the Coordinating Council
of the newly-formed Union of Ukrainian Students. The head of
the Union said that the students decided to trust the Ukrainian
Supreme Soviet, which had promised to examine the entire range
of students' demands in May. (Roman Solchanyk)

UKRAINIAN SUPREME SOVIET ON "SOYUZ". The Ukrainian Supreme Soviet
yesterday appealed to the top state organs of the republics and
the USSR criticizing the "Soyuz" group in the Soviet parliament,
Ukrinform-TASS reported April 25. The statement says that the
call by some "Soyuz" members for a country-wide state of emergency
represents an attempt to return to the times of "the administrative-repressive
system." It says that the Ukrainian Supreme Soviet is in control
of the situation in the republic, and that calls such as those
put forth by "Soyuz" are inadmissible and violate Ukrainian sovereignty.
(Roman Solchanyk)

SOVIET TV FROWNS ON KRAVCHUK FOR SPEAKING UKRAINIAN. During Ukrainian
Supreme Soviet Chairman Leonid Kravchuk's recent visit to Germany,
his insistence on using the Ukrainian language during his negotiations
in Bonn and Munich confused his German partners: they could not
find an appropriate translator, said a commentator on Vremya,
April 25. "What would happen if diplomats from Bavaria visiting
Moscow would ask for a translator from the Bavarian dialect,
which is unknown in most of Germany?", said Vladimir Kondrat'ev,
Central Television's correspondent in Bonn. (Victor Yasmann)


ARMENIAN SUPSOV CALLS FOR SPECIAL SESSION OF USSR CPD. The extraordinary
session of the Armenian Supreme Soviet which opened April 25
has called for a special session of the USSR Congress of People's
Deputies to discuss the situation in those areas of Azerbaijan
which have a predominantly Armenian population, TASS reported
that day. Azerbaijan has recently abolished several Armenian-populated
raions as separate territorial-administrative units. The Armenian
press has for months charged that Azerbaijan is planning a mass
deportation of Armenians. (Liz Fuller)

SYMBOLIC GENERAL STRIKE IN GEORGIA. A three-minute general strike
took place in Georgia April 25 in support of demands for the
withdrawal of Soviet troops from South Ossetia, according to
the Georgian news agency Sakinform. TASS April 25 quoted the
newspaper of the Georgian Social-Democratic Party as arguing
that the former status of the South Ossetian Autonomous Oblast
should be restored. (Liz Fuller)

ARMY "SOLE REMAINING BAR" TO MOLDAVIAN POPULAR FRONT. The Soviet
armed forces daily Krasnaya zvezda April 19 charged that the
Moldavian Popular Front "is actively preparing for the ultimate
political battle with the Center, the Army, the Communists, and
those who disagree with its views". "The army remains today the
sole bar holding back the ambitions and extremism of the resolute
Frontists," it said. Krasnaya zvezda described the Front as "the
leading political force in Moldavia... All local authority structures
are in fact subordinate to it. The Front determines the government's
policy decisions, calls the tune in parliament, and orchestrates
the clamorous public campaigns". (Vladimir Socor)

ROMANIAN PRESIDENT DENOUNCES MOLDAVIAN POPULAR FRONT. At a press
conference in Bucharest April 24, defending the recently signed
Romanian-Soviet treaty, Romanian President Ion Iliescu denounced
the Moldavian Popular Front as harboring "sectarian and extremist
views". Iliescu was reacting to the Front's criticism of his
government as "neocommunist" and of the treaty as seriously flawed.
The Romanian official media failed to report Iliescu's remark,
but it was reported by TASS the same day and it could be seen
live on Moldavian TV. (Vladimir Socor)

ROMANIAN OFFICIAL ON "ROMANIAN LANDS" BESSARABIA AND NORTH BUKOVINA.
Interviewed by the Sueddeutsche Zeitung April 25, Romanian Assistant
Prime Minister and Minister for Economic Reforms Adrian Severin
called for "human rights and the right of self-determination"
to be granted to Romanians in the "Romanian lands" of Bessarabia
and North Bukovina. Although Romania has "historic rights" to
the two provinces, Severin said, it favors the "autonomy" of
Bessarabia and North Bukovina leading toward "a second Romanian
state," under the formula, "one people, two states". The question
of reunification, Severin said, should be deferred to the future
and the decisions of the people involved; "Bucharest does not
wish to initiate border changes". (Vladimir Socor).

KISHINEV SCORES ECCLESIASTICAL SUBORDINATION TO RUSSIAN PATRIARCHATE.
Moldavia's Minister of Culture and Religious Affairs, Ion Ungureanu,
has again expressed Kishinev's discontent with the canonical
subordination of the Eparchy of Moldavia to the Russian Orthodox
Church, Kathpress reported in a dispatch from Kishinev carried
by the Sueddeutsche Zeitung April 25. Ungureanu said that this
situation prevents the Church from supporting the Moldavian people's
aspirations for national independence. Although Moldavia has
proclaimed sovereignty, "we still belong from the ecclesiastical
point of view not only to the USSR, but even to Russia". (Vladimir
Socor)

KAZAKHSTAN CREATES SATELLITE TELEVISION COMPANY WITH SAUDIS.
The new satellite television company "Asia TV" has been established
in Alma-Ata by the joint Soviet-Saudi Arabian bank "Al Baraka",
the Baikonur space center, and other state and public All-Union
organizations, reported TASS on April 25. Thanks to satellites
the station's signal will available in many countries, said the
company's president, Altyn Galiev. Galiev stressed the commercial
orientation of his company and added that personnel will be recruited
on a contract basis. He did not mention what the main broadcasting
language of the station would be: Russian, Kazakh or Arabic.
(Victor Yasmann)

[as of 1300 CET]

Compiled by Patrick Moore and Sallie Wise


[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° GuestbookS

1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11- Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.